Sprouted Mung Bean Dosa (Pesarattu) and Coconut Chutney

A nutritious kick start for the day leaves you feeling good the entire day. Pesarattu or sprouted mung bean dosa is an Andhra native. I had never tried this dosa though I had seen it on restaurant menus. My sister-in-law, a girl born and brought up in Karnataka, was recovering from a bad bout of fever for which she was on antibiotics and steroids. When I asked her what special care she took to regain good health, she told me about the mung dosa she makes. Usually pesarattu is made of soaked mung bean. She makes it with sprouted mung and adds peanuts too while grinding the batter. I tried her version of pesarattu today and I loved it. So here is the recipe.

Ingredients:
For grinding:
Mung bean (green gram/cheru payar) – 2 cups
Raw rice – 1/2 cup
Onion (medium size) – 1 (optional)
Ginger – 1/2 inch
Coriander leaves – 5-7 stalks
Hing – 1/2 tsp
Jeera – 1/2 tsp
Green chilies – 3-4
Salt – as needed
Water – as needed

For cooking:
Oil – 1 tbsp

Method:
Wash and soak the mung bean in water for 8 hours or overnight. After 8 hours, drain the water and keep the wet mung beans in the same vessel for the next 24 hours. You will see sprouts coming out within 12 hours. You can keep it longer (24 hours) to get longer sprouts.

Soak raw rice in water for 3-4 hours. Grind sprouted mung bean and soaked raw rice along with onion, ginger, coriander leaves, hing, jeera, green chillies, and salt to make a fine paste. Add sufficient water to the batter. Do not make it too loose. This is an instant dosa batter and does not need fermentation.

Heat a griddle and spread a ladle full of batter on the griddle. Maintain medium heat. Drizzle 1/2 tsp of oil on the spread batter/dosa. When the sides of the dosa start turning brown (less than a minute), gently flip over the dosa using a spatula. Cook for less than a minute. Flip over to check if the dosa has become golden brown. Serve with chutney/sambar or milaga podi/gun powder. If you prefer a topping for this dosa, after you spread the dosa, you can sprinkle finely chopped onion and coriander or even cheese. Gently spread and press the onion and coriander pieces to the dosa using a spatula. Be careful when you flip the dosa over so that these pieces do not fall off. If you are adding cheese, add shredded cheese to the dosa only after it is full cooked, just before you take it off the griddle.

You can refrigerate this dosa batter for 3-4 days.

I made coconut chutney spiced with green chillies and ginger to go along with this dosa.

Ingredients:

Grated coconut – 1/2 of a medium-sized coconut
Green chilies – 3
Ginger – 1/4 inch
Coriander leaves – 5-6 stalks
Water – as needed
Salt – as needed

Method:
Wash the green chillies, coriander leaves, and ginger. Be careful about the amount of ginger you use. Ginger can make the chutney fiery. I am not a ginger fan. So I usually use just enough to get a hint of ginger. If you like to use more ginger, use less of green chillies. Grind all the ingredients using sufficient water. I did not do a tadka for this chutney, but if you prefer a tadka, you can heat mustard seeds and urad dal in some oil. When the mustard seeds splutter and the urad dal turns red, add curry leaves to the oil and mix well with the chutney.

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7 Comments

  1. My wife, who is orginally from Uttranchal, but resides in Banglore, used to make this . I think I will do the preparation tonight and have this for breakfast. I will go for a tomato based chutney, where I will suate some onion, add garlic, lil tamarind, some red chilli, salt and tomato and then grind the whole thing.

    I know it sounds absolutely horrible but i swear by its taste.

    I see that this is the wrong site to look for some fish fry.

    Like

    1. The chutney sounds good to me. I love tangy chutneys and its a perfect combo to the pesarattu which is non-fermented and hence not sour. I will definitely try this combo.
      Thanks for visiting.

      Like

  2. Thank you some nice ideas for south indian cooking….I was getting tired of my usual idli, dosa, upma, sambar, malagoshyam, puli, upperi, routine….

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  3. Marrying an army officer changed the definition of breakfast for me. I was used to cereals/oats with milk in Bombay. But the nutritional breakfast came into being after marriage. Now, I am on the lookout for nutritious, easy to make recipes. The highlight of your recipes for me is that the ingredients are present in my kitchen.

    5 stars to you and Samagni!

    Like

    1. Thank you, Sneha. Even I love occasional muesli breakfast but having born and brought up in a traditional South Indian household, I am used to carb-heavy breakfasts and dosas are my favorite. Sprouted bajra, ragi, and mung bean dosas are some healthy variations that I relish. I hope that the readers of this blog also make them regularly 🙂
      Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Like

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